EYE:

You are stuck in an elevator with a Historical Figure (living or dead) and have just enough time to ask one question before you are saved. Who is it and what question do you ask him? 

Rappaport:

Bill Gates – what did you have planned next, in terms of innovation, if you didn’t pass away.  Your next creation/invention?

 
 

EYE:

You are given a unlimited black card to buy one piece of art at auction. You can’t ever sell it or get any financial gain from it, you can just put it in your home to enjoy. What do you buy?    

Rappaport:

Something from Banksy – a custom piece he makes on the spot

 

EYE:

You get an fully paid 90-days off work to volunteer for a cause to help make the world better. What do you volunteer for?   

Rappaport:

I’d love to do a Big Brother mentor program. Work with someone who maybe doesn’t have a mentor/big brother in their life – on top of that a non-profit summer camp or program for kids who may not have the best lives at home but are able to get away for a bit during the summer, and need leadership/guidance.

 

EYE:

What is the last out-of-home ad you saw that made you either go do something (make a purchase, take a trip, see a show, etc.) or stop and say “WOW great execution”? 

Rappaport:

Away Luggage.  Saw them all over NYC – but then saw that they started partnering with Dwayne Wade. As a big NBA fan, loved the luggage line – the product – the built in battery/USB port.  Went online and ordered a piece right away. They’re an incredible emerging brand and it’s a great piece of luggage.

 

EYE:

As you look across the out-of-home media landscape, what shifts are happening in 2018 that are having the largest positive impact on our industry? 

Rappaport:

I think the continued evolution of DOOH, and utilization of real-time data has been very interesting. There’s the activation JetBlue did with Google Maps’ API to calculate the exact amount of time it would take for you to get to a certain destination from a specific point in Times Square.  It took into account vehicular traffic, airport delays, down to the minute. The continual roll out and development of LINK NYC – and soon to be LINK Philadelphia also are good examples of how DOOH is starting to weave itself into markets. It’ll also be interesting to see how the NYC Subway system continues to shift to a more digital landscape (i.e. Videri technology, brand trains, and 2-sheets)

 

EYE:

We are arguably in early stages of technology shift across our industry. From digital screens to the impact of mobile and measurement to the opportunities around augmented reality and virtual reality. What technology shift happening today do you predict will have the biggest positive impact on the out of home industry and why? 

Rappaport:

I think both the expansion of sound within the OOH space, and the ability of brands to make a one-to-one connection with the consumer are two trends to keep an eye on.  I think that the ability for brands to utilize ambient sound, or add that layer to an activation/out of home placement will amplify the message and opportunity to reach the consumer. One-to-one tech is definitely interesting where you’re able to connect with a consumer based on mobile data pulled – so for instance a fitness enthusiast is looking at one screen and sees a Peleton ad, whereas right next to that person a frequent domestic traveler is looking at another screen and is served a Royal Caribbean ad. As the industry shifts towards a more digital landscape, one-to-one tech will be something to keep an eye on.

 

EYE:

As you look at how 2018 is shaping up, the OOH industry is reporting continued single digit growth but individual operators report mixed results. What trends are you seeing in 2018 that you believe offer the biggest opportunity for OOH media?  

Rappaport:

The continual growth of the D2C + Tech Space. The Casper’s, Away’s, LYFT’s, Glossier’s + Everlane’s. These are the brands we’re seeing take over the subway, utilize the airport space, start to open pop up spaces. It’s important to stay on top of them, and get in touch with their Heads’ of Growth – and educate them about the continual evolution of OOH measurement – and how they can speak directly to their target demo while creating brand awareness through OOH. Contextual messaging via DOOH is another trend to keep an eye on. Being able to speak to a specific neighborhood, play off of localized events have allowed advertisers to be a lot more creative in the OOH space than ever before.

 

EYE:

As you speak to your clients today, are there any trends you are seeing in what they demand from their out-of-home executions vs a few years ago?   

Rappaport:

Definitely more of a focus on measurement – and if OOH is leading to a specific conversion. Some brands/clients are perfectly fine with mass brand awareness (biggest/boldest/most impactful) – but the majority of brands are focusing on efficiency of OOH – attribution, and if they’re really reaching their target demo. This is where the rollout of Geopath’s new platform, and data partners like Neustar have really helped in increasing dollars allocated towards OOH vs other media channels.

 

EYE:

Measurement continues to be a primary topic and focus. The ability to buy OOH media by audience and impressions is fast becoming reality. Once this is fully in place, do you believe we will see growth specifically attributable to that capability?    

Rappaport:

Yes for sure!  I think the ability to target specific audience segments/groups is going to be a huge plus for brands in terms of spending in the OOH space.  Additionally the ability for more granular reporting, and buying by daypart/hourly rather than to be in market during times where you may not be necessarily hitting the audience you’re looking to hit are huge pluses that will help generate growth in the space.

 

EYE:

Out of home media has always been a one-to-many medium. Metrics and technology are enabling more of a one-to-few or even one-to-one capability. Do you believe this more targeted approach is the right way to use out-of-home and why?   

Rappaport:

As mentioned above, definitely. It shows a willingness for a brand to speak directly to a potential consumer. It ties back into the utilization of mobile data in OOH – both in measurement, and creative messaging.

 

EYE:

There are some amazing digital place based networks in the market today that enable brands to engage consumers throughout there day when going to a movie, running through an airport, exercising in a gym, riding in an elevator, taking a taxi, filling up the gas tank, shopping in a mall, and even just out and about the streets of the city.  As you evaluate these networks for your clients, what are a couple factors or capabilities that make a digital network stand out as one to recommend? 

Rappaport:

How refined can you be – how targeted can you get?  Being in an office building elevator is great, but what if I’m looking to speak to SMB owners who have 15 employees or less, and work in the medical sector? Is their the ability to be that granular – to speak to just that audience rather than every major office building in NYC? Can you utilize real time data? Can you daypart – be flexible with creative? Is their the option to bake in a post-campaign attribution study?

 

EYE:

As we look at pressure across alternate media platforms like facebook, google, search and mobile, what is best thing the OOH industry can do to adjust to stay relevant?    

Rappaport:

Evolve, and don’t be afraid to work with other media channels that once may have taken dollars away from the OOH space – but now can possibly be looked at as a partner. A good example is how Waze is focusing on further amplifying OOH buys through their platform vs positioning themselves solely as a digital asset.

 

EYE:

As you advise your clients on the role of out of home in their media mix, what are a couple of the key benefits you push that seem to resignate well with clients?   

Rappaport:

Contextual Messaging, Building Brand Awareness, Creative Flexibility via DOOH, Consumer Engagement (via interactive activations/placements), Continued evolution of data and measurement (Geopath, Neustar Data, Attribution partners like Mira)

 

EYE:

If you were advising the out-of-home media industry givin the dynamic shifts happening in the industry today, what are the top 2-3 considerations you would recommend the industry pay attention to as it tries to position itself for the future?   

Rappaport:

Focus on measurement and attribution – you’ll always have a leg up if you can prove that OOH works and can speak to a specific audience.  The more rationale the better. If you can find a way to offer post-campaign analysis/measurement/wrap-up that’s going to endear yourself greatly to clients who are a bit nervous about utilizing the OOH space.  Evolve to work with other media channels – specifically social….how can you amplify an OOH execution via Twitter/Instagram?  Think about the way you sell – why does it have to be on 4 week cycles? What about focusing more of what hits a certain audience (weekends of events, certain days, hours) – may make life more difficult, but ultimately lead to more dollars in the OOH space.